Dating nicknames


23-Oct-2016 10:06

After all, if the person who loves you thinks you’re stupid then it must be true.

Remember, if the person you love is making you feel bad about yourself then he/she really doesn’t love you. You should feel free to express who you really are with your partner. For confidential help, please call the National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline: 1-866-331-9474.

Any time your partner chooses to insult you, your appearance, your intelligence, your choices or opinions it’s emotional abuse.

Yes, your partner can have his/her own opinions, but when they question your ideas to the point of insult or humiliation, it becomes emotional abuse.

By insulting you he/she is making you more dependent.

Many abusers will humiliate or embarrass their partners in public as a method of control to “prove” that only the abuser can love them.

There is no need to spell them out here; you can imagine what kinds of words they use.A victim of emotional abuse may start to blame themselves for the abuser’s behavior and come to believe what the abuser says.Constant criticism will compel the victim to “improve” him/herself. People abbreviate it OKC, which always makes me wonder what’s up in Oklahoma City. – who’s the curator of a pathology museum in the UK and who has a wonderful Twitter handle: La Petit Mort-ician. The name was originally Matchbox; it was deemed too close to competitor Match and changed to Tinderbox, then shortened to Tinder.

That’s when this company was founded by a 66-year-old psychologist, Neil Clark Warren, who’s now north of 80 and still running the show. And can you say “Ok, Cupid” to your Android phone, the way you’d say “OK, Google”? You can read it as descriptive (making a match) or as metaphorical (strike a match, find your flame). Talk about a niche market: this is a site “to enable people in the death industry” – pathologists, funeral organizers, taxidermists, crematorium techs – “to meet like-minded individuals.” It was founded by Carla Valentine – timely tie-in alert! This is the gamified future of dating: a mobile app, launched in 2012, that dispenses with the personal data and just shows photos (swipe right for a hit, left for a miss).

Having others call you names might roll right off you.